payments Tag

Recent technology advancements have pointed us in the direction of linking our DNA to everything we do. Biometrics technology is already working its way into our daily lives; from smartphone “touch ID” to cars that unlock with your handprint. It is no surprise then that many financial institutions and governments have already embraced biometric authentication as the standard for verifying the identity of customers opening accounts, requesting services, and making payments. There will be 770 million biometric authentication apps downloaded annually by 2019 (according to Juniper’s research).  Payment services are increasingly taking advantage of biometrics to improve security and convenience by eliminating the need for users to enter passwords or use other cumbersome manual authentication methods. Thanks to companies like Apple and Samsung, many banks are already allowing touch ID to authorize payments and money transfers, and some banks in Europe are allowing ATM withdrawals with the same fingerprint authorization (no card or PIN required). And vendors could certainly benefit from using the technology to authorize payments and cut down on fraud. Biometrics are unique human physical characteristics, such as fingerprints, that can be used for automated authentication. Their growing use in payment solutions is driven largely by increase of touch ID hardware in mobile phones, although they can also be incorporated into other devices such as ATMs and payment terminals. Benefits of Biometrics As Means Of Payment. They free users from having to remember and enter multiple passwords: many of us have memorized more than 5 different passwords for different platforms.  Some users may have as many as 200 online accounts, each requiring secure controls over access. Biometrics eliminates this as only...

As customers’ financial behaviors evolve to include digital banking and financial technologies—like peer-to-peer payment, virtual currency, mobile payments and mobile wallets—tokenization is one of the most important new technologies merchants can leverage to stand in the way of cybercriminal access to customer payment information. What is Tokenization? It is recommended that consumers use a paper shredder to destroy bank account statements, checkbook registers, tax forms, payment receipts and similar documents that include sensitive data because any account number reflected on the document that wasn’t destroyed beyond recognition could be used fraudulently. Similarly, when a shopper buys something online, they are required to divulge confidential and sensitive information, such as their address and ATM card info.  Giving out this information online is risky since it may be stolen and used fraudulently. Much like a paper shredder renders account information meaningless so that it’s made nearly impossible to re-assemble, repurpose or identify, the same theory applies to tokenization—through technology. Basically, tokenization is the process of replacing sensitive data with unique identification symbols that capture all the vital information about the data without compromising its security. The algorithmically generated number used to replace the sensitive data is called a token. How It Works Typical consumer credit/debit (ATM) cards come with names, 16-digit personal account numbers (PANs), expiration dates and security codes — any of which can be "tokenized." When a merchant swipes a customer's credit card, the PAN is automatically replaced with a randomly generated alphanumeric ID (“token”). The original PAN never enters the merchant's payment system; only the token ID does. The merchant can use this special token ID to keep records of the...