Tech

By 2030 one in five people will be African. Africa will account for more than half (54%) of the 2.4 billion global population growth in coming decades. The United Nations predicts that between 2015 and 2050, Africa will add 1.3 billion people, more than doubling its current population of 1.2 billion. Combine the continent’s soaring population with technology, improvements in infrastructure, health and education, and Africa could be the next century’s economic growth powerhouse. Africa has had a sporadic growth in Technology through the development from spears and arrows from trees, to the discovery of machines and software to making life better. Even in this evolution of Africa in Science and Technology, research still shows that Africa portrays a gap in Technology compared to the rest of the technology inclined world, due to the myopia on the part of its Government to recognize the value and need for science and technology in its country’s development. As Africa transitions from the margins to the mainstream of the global economy, technology is playing an increasingly significant role. According to the IMF’s 2014 World Economic Outlook report, of the ten fastest growing economies in the world, six will be from Africa. Past Technological Achievements Despite suffering through the era of horrific system of slavery, countless contributions to the fields of science and technology was made by early Africans. The first evidence of tools used by African ancestors is interred in valleys across Sub-Saharan Africa. There is no doubt that tech and innovation can play a big role in making some countries richer than others. About half the differences in GDP per person between countries are due...

Necessity is the mother of invention, and in Africa it has been the mother of innovation. While the continent is vastly different, the level of innovation has been interesting to watch, largely fuelled by the equalizing nature of technology and mobile telephony. Most discussions of the origins of Africa’s tech movement circle back to Kenya in 2007, when Kenyan telecom Safaricom launched the M-PESA mobile money product. M-PESA allows people to store money on mobile accounts and make simple transfers via SMS messaging — you don't even need a smartphone to use it. MPESA (known popularly as mobile money) is an innovative technology which allows people to send money and conduct other financial transactions using their mobile phones. M-PESA has grown from Kenya and is now being replicated in many countries such as India, Afghanistan,Egypt, Ghana, and even countries in Eastern Europe, among others. Groups that typically have limited access to formal financial services have benefited from the financial products offered through M-Pesa. Africans are more Mobile, and Mobile is the Future The proliferation of mobile phone networks has transformed communications in sub-Saharan Africa. It has also allowed Africans to skip the landline stage of development and jump right to the digital age." Essentially, Africa leaped over the PC era and landed directly in the mobile revolution. Which is why we are better at mobile money that others. The rise of M-PESA is largely due the dominance of mobile on the continent. Because of M-PESA, Kenya is the leading e-commerce capital of the world. This one app moves an entire third of the Kenyan GDP among its 15 million, mostly rural,...

Last week, we learnt about the interconnectedness of devices, humans and the cloud and how that has impacted the world today. We will go on to talk about the applications of IoT; this will give us a glimpse of how IoT will transform our lives soon. Smart Homes Smart home products promise to save time, energy and money. Wouldn’t you love to be able to switch on your air conditioner before getting home, so the house can be cool before you arrive? Or switch off your lights even after leaving the house? Or grant your friends access to your house when you are not home? IoT has made it possible for companies to build products that make life convenient and simpler. It is predicted that smart homes will become as common as mobile phones. Connected Cars A connected car is a vehicle which can optimize its own operation, maintenance as well as comfort of passengers using onboard sensors and internet connectivity. The automotive digital technology has focused on optimizing vehicles internal functions. But now, this attention is growing towards enhancing the in-car experience. Major brands like Tesla, BMW, Apple, Google are working on bringing the next revolution in automobiles. IoT in Agriculture Smart farming is often overlooked when it comes to the business cases for IoT solutions. However, there are many innovative products on the market geared toward forward-thinking farmers. Some of them use a distributed network of smart sensors to monitor various natural conditions, such as humidity, air temperature, and soil quality. Others are used to automate irrigation systems. With the continuous increase in world’s population, demand for food supply is...

Security is Vital You take basic security precautions every day -- you use a key to get into your house and log on to your computer with a username and password. You've probably also experienced the panic that comes with misplaced keys and forgotten passwords. It isn't just that you can't get what you need -- if you lose your keys or jot your password on a piece of paper, someone else can find them and use them as though they were you. What is biometrics?? Instead of using something you have (like a key) or something you know (like a password), biometrics uses who you are to identify you. Biometrics can use physical characteristics, like your face, fingerprints, irises or veins, or behavioral characteristics like your voice, handwriting or typing rhythm. Unlike keys and passwords, your personal traits are extremely difficult to lose or forget. They can also be very difficult to copy. For this reason, many people consider them to be safer and more secure than keys or passwords. Biometric authentication is simply the process of verifying your identity using your measurements or other unique characteristics of your body, then logging you in a service, an app, a device and so on.. [caption id="attachment_8491" align="aligncenter" width="387"] Authentication of fingerprints[/caption] How Does it Work? Biometric systems can seem complicated, but they aren’t. What is complicated is the technology behind it.  All biometric systems use the same three steps: Enrollment: The first time you use a biometric system, it records basic information about you, like your name or an identification number. It then captures an image or recording of your specific trait. Storage: Contrary to what you...

ChamsAccess is in the business of providing reliability, quality and convenience in card printing and personalization. That said, it would be beneficial to have an understanding of the various technologies used in card printing. Some of them are: PVC Plastic card Printing technology Plastic cards are ideal for many applications, which makes them prevalent in our daily lives. Their portability, durability and standard size is suitable for payment cards, driver's licenses, membership cards and employee identification badge. Card printers let you print customised, secure and cost-effective cards on demand. Cards can be printed in colour or monochrome and can be encoded with multiple features like magnetic stripes or RFID to extend their use from highly secure employee IDs to gift card applications. To print images onto plastic cards, card printer uses dye sublimation technology. The dye sublimation process uses three panels (YMC) for colour and one panel (K) for black. YMC are used for colour picture and K for black text. An overlay panel is used to protect colour picture and text from wear and tear. Monochrome Printing Monochrome printing uses a single colour such as black, white, blue, red, gold, silver etc. This is the most cost-effective method to personalize with pre-printed cards. It is the ideal solution for cards printing that do not require colour picture. Monochrome is often used to print barcodes. Colour Printing Colour printing uses colour ribbon composed of yellow, magenta and cyan panel. The plastic card is passed through a thermal print head together with colour panels. The colour from the panel is then transferred on to the cards though the heat given out from the print head. The standard...